Throughout the project, we’ll post questions and comments that have been submitted on comment cards collected at community meetings, sent via email or submitted via the website.

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Rn-1

What does zone RN-1 mean?
Staff Reply:
The RN-1 district is a single family district that permits one family dwellings on lots with a minimum size of 10,000 square feet. Two family dwellings (duplexes) are permitted upon approval by the Planning Commission as a special use. Please see the Residential District Comparison Table for additional information. https://recodeknoxville.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Knoxville-Residential-Districts-Comparison.pdfThanks for your email.

Home Based Business With Employee

With the recode of Knoxville, will employees be allowed to work at a home based business?
Staff Reply:
The proposed zoning code update would allow home occupations in all residential districts. Certain restrictions would be in place; only one employee other than residents of the home; no outdoor storage; no increase in noise, traffic; limitations on retail sales; and other standards to minimize any potential impact on residential areas.

Zoning Change

We are currently zoned R1 and with the latest map, it changes us to RN2. So what does that mean exactly and what are the differences from the R1 we currently are zoned.Thank you!
Staff Reply:
The proposed RN-2 zone is a single family residential district very equivalent to the existing R-1. The major difference is the proposed minimum lot size in RN-1 of 5,000 square feet, designed to accommodate lots in some of Knoxville's older neighborhoods. Please see the Residential District Comparison Table for additional information. https://recodeknoxville.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Knoxville-Residential-Districts-Comparison.pdf

Hillside Ridgetop Protection Zone

I see from the map that my property and that of my two neighbors is almost entirely covered with the Hillside Ridgetop Protection Zone. What does that mean for us? Can we still cut and plant new trees? The property of one of my neighbors is entirely level. Why would it be included in the HP zone?
Staff Reply:
The proposed Hillside Protection standards would limit the density (# of dwelling units) and the land disturbance permitted in new developments. The limitation would be on new developments on property with a slope of more than 15%. The limitations would not apply to existing single family homes and existing lots of record, nor would they restrict the cutting or planting of trees. The notation of HP on the zoning map is an indication that the property appears to be in the hillside area and that review of the property's slope is warranted.

Spence Place

I own the property at Spence place in the Island home neighborhood.It is a through lot bounded by Spence place on the south and the Tennessee river on the north.My lot is 132 ft wide, 429 ft deep. The house is set back 40 ft from the road, the attached carport is set back 26 ft from the road. The east side set back is 5 ft for the carport and 50 ft on the west side.It seems to me It should be classified as RN-1 not RN-2.It seems to me that all of the parcels on the north side of Spence should have been designated RN-2 since they meet the size and set back requirements of RN-1.
Staff Reply:
The properties north of Spence Pl were included as RN-2 to have one consistent zone for the Island Home neighborhood. Due to your concerns, I have added a map comment based on your email so it can be reviewed for the next map draft. You may also add an additional map comment here. These comments take 24 hours to show up so you may not see it right away.

Hillside Protection

I notice that a portion of my property, that includes about half of my house, falls within an area designated HP. I can't find any definitive resource regarding HP online, except references back to 2008-2011. I'm interested in what restrictions the HP designation will place, both on me as an established homeowner and on the newly developed apartment complex abutting my property. Can you point to a resource so we may understand what's about to happen to us?
Staff Reply:
The hillside protection standards would place density and land disturbance limitations on new development located on properties within the HP overlay (properties with grades in excess of 15%). The greater the grade of the property, the greater the limitations on density and land disturbance. The hillside protection standards would not apply to existing single family homes and existing lots of record, so your home would be exempt. As a developed project, the apartment complex abutting your property would not be subject to any limitations either. If the apartment complex proposed expansion (new buildings), the hillside protection standards might limit density (# of dwelling units) and land disturbance.

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