Throughout the project, we’ll post questions and comments that have been submitted on comment cards collected at community meetings, sent via email or submitted via the website.

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Showing 51-100 comments of 779

Notification

Do you have a facebook page or other Social Media that can keep me updated as to what's being built in the area? or what is going on in the area? I often do not hear of anything going on along Rutledge Pike. Would be nice if "noise makers" i.e. KPD can provide notice when they are going through a recruiting class at the Cement Plant Road location. It seems that our area gets overlooked a lot!
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Sidewalks

I would like to see a sidewalk from the Rocky Hill shopping center to Rocky Hill School. There is so much school traffic on that road and the road is not very wide. I think a sidewalk would be very helpful and make the road a lot safer.
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Sun And Lights

Existing houses and buildings should have their amount of sunlight protected from new buildings either in front or behind them, therefore a new building across the street should not interfere with the amount of sunlight your house gets. A good example is the big apt. complex on the 1700 block of White avenue blocking the winter sunlight from coming in the windows of the old 'Hawkeyes" building across the street.Also, I would be in favor of 'low light' regulations for nighttime lighting both public and private. Flagstaff, AZ has done a good job at this.Thanks!
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(no Title)

As zoning laws should be more neighborhood specific and more strict... It should all be more transparent, easier to understand, with less red tape for small business. In my history, I have watched small businesses (including myself) walk into projects blindly and pay dearly. Information and clarity should be more easily available to the business community.
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Survey Follow-up

I think one of the most important things to consider in the development of new ordinances is the impact they will have on poorer neighborhoods. Renovation of old buildings is important when it leads to safer structures and vitalized neighborhoods, but when the cost of that is the well-to-do driving out the poor no good has been accomplished.
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Zoning

I think this is a great effort! I was chair of the city's BZA a few years back and the Code does need to be thrown out and replaced in whole. During my tenure we gave variances for add-ons in Fourth and Gill simply because the owner would otherwise be obligated to follow setbacks designed for West Hills. We granted a number of reduced parking variances that have had no adverse consequences in the intervening years. The variance process, however, is ultimately not a good method for getting the right results for the city. It is expensive, time-consuming, and unpredictable. I'm glad the city is undertaking this important initiative.
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Knoxville Is Great!

I love living in Knoxville. The parks, bicycle lanes, greenways...everything is lovely here. Thanks for all you do.
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No Short Term Rentals!!

I am COMPLETELY against any short term rentals being allowed in R-1 residential neighborhoods. That would NOT BE A GOOD THING!
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Zoning Regulations

We desperately need sidewalks to connect neighborhoods to each other and to commercial districts for food and entertainment. We also need to bury utilities instead of cutting down trees around the utility lines. This is a never ending cycle. If we make the initial investment (albeit an expensive one) it will pay off in the long run. Obviously the annual expense of tree trimming will be less but it will add value to community both aesthetically and will attract more businesses in the long run. We want to keep Knoxville beautiful and if we keep massacring trees this is not possible!!
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Survey Methodology

While I am likely in favor of whatever progressive ideas and goals Recode Knoxville is proposing, I thought the survey was biased. Rather than appearing open to the various ideas and opinions that respondents and the public might have, for several questions, the survey taker was asked to agree or disagree with seemingly positive improvements. If the intent of the survey is to gather the ideas from respondents about different municipal ideas and proposals, then ask for the ideas those respondents might have, or set up a fair Likert scale to gauge one's interest in various ideas. For example, take this question: "Do you support expanding corridors, which were originally [but it read "thoughtlessly"] made for cars, in order to support transportation for bicycles and pedestrians?" It forces someone with a different perspective to disagree, which is an unfair set-up. Instead, a more fair question would ask, "Do you favor future corridor development that favors vehicles or non-automotive transportation?" In this way, the respondent can offer a response to a question that genuinely requests their ideas and opinion.Just something to keep in mind for future survey development. If you truly want others' honest opinions and ideas, then ask for them. Insinuating appropriate or inappropriate responses through biased instrument construction is unlikely to get others on your side.My two cents.
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Survey

The survey is great. Glad we are starting to think "outside the box". It is likely that some survey takers will feel the questions lead to the desired responses. I felt that way but agree with where the questions led me.
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Zoning Codes

Looking to the future--I would like for the planning commission to re-consider zoning provisions that allow crematories at funeral homes. As a resident of Fountain City, I am appalled and still outraged at how the city MPC, permitting, and City Council handled the Gentry-Griffey funeral home's supposedly secondary use permit for a crematory addition. Apparently no one at the city checks to see if cremations are indeed the secondary use. Gentry-Griffey (owned by an LLC) contracts with several counties to cremate remains of indigents and remains from the medical examiner's office. According to my daily look at the Sentinel's obit pages, Gentry-Griffey doesn't do many funerals, so how could they stay in business if cremation is not their primary business? If Gentry-Griffey's cremations are not secondary, but primary, should their permit not be revoked and a fine imposed? The new zoning provisions passed a few years ago (after the hurried, non-public approval of Gentry-Griffey's 24 hour, 7 day a week permit was issued and then opposed by a citizen group in Fountain City) now allow crematories at any funeral home, no matter the zoning, I can imagine that we could have a couple more crematories in Fountain City (in that there are several funeral homes here) and we could then kiss Fountain City's neighborhoods' ambiance goodbye. Such a shame the current state of this zoning puts us in! My biggest problem with Knoxville's zoning is that it is not enforced. Inspections and reports should be made, especially in cases of secondary use permits.As to your survey, some questions/proposed responses were ambiguous. I tried to respond in a way that reflects my view that neighborhood integrity should be honored, businesses should have to respect residents' reasonable wishes (as to appearance, addition of or re-purposing of commercial buildings, addition of multi-family buildings, to name a few.Thank you for providing the survey. I am signing up for the newsletter.
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Multi-family Properties

I am a real estate agent, past resident of Knox County, graduate of Knox County Schools, and a current owner of a duplex in Knox County. I find it onerous that duplexes are taxed as commercial property, especially considering that the property can not be used for any purpose that would ordinarily be considered a commercial activity. This needlessly increases the expense involved in owning such a property while making it difficult to provide affordable housing.
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(no Title)

I love my house in 4th and gill..We were in the process of establishing a winter home , Husband died 2012. I love my house,but I am still resolving property elsewhere.
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Roads

I think a concerted effort needs to be made to widen all secondary and connector roads. They are dangerous to foot traffic, bicycles, and automobile traffic. To have the percentage of such narrow roads and absolutely no shoulders is, in my opinion, restricting not only commercial and residential growth but also restricting other means of travel/commuting aside from auto, e.g. biking and walking for fear of getting run over.
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Zoning

Seems to me that Zoning serves only one meister: fear. In cities like Asheville, vacant city lots go for $30k or more. We can't even give them away here. I look forward to the day when we stop using armed force and instead use peaceful means to engage diversity.
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Rezoning

Please consider more flexibility and guidance for building tiny or very small homes in blighted areas as a way to increase affordable housing.
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Neighborhood Safety

I'm fine with multi-family units in residential areas as long as stricter regulations are enforced to keep slumlords from renting out to people who sell drugs or partake in other criminal lifestyles. The neighborhood I live in has been plagued with an increase in crime rate these past 6mos and it always traces back to rental properties and the section 8 houses in the area. People here are now afraid to let their kids and animals go outside in fear that they'll be shot by stray bullets from the battles going on between different crack houses that have started considering themselves as part of gangs and then the police don't show up for hours, if at all. I bought my house 2yrs ago and am now starting to regret putting roots down in Knoxville.
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Wasteful Spending

Too many parks and greenways, You should do full studies of what age groups, and how many people use these facilities. The streets were made to drive on. Fix the pot holes. Pave the roads, they are in terrible shape. Stop wasting money on bicycle lanes, and unnecessary landscaping.Stop bringing in outside "experts" from big cities that don understand what the taxpayers really want
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Codes & Standards

While I encourage the redevelopment of existing facilities and mixed-use development, I don't think that government should go as far as to regulate landscaping and actual architectural expression in building materials. For example, having an area of mixed use development that requires street level windows or retail is okay, but don't require the building look just like every other building on the block. Also, pedestrian and bike corridors are great where feasible, but if the expense is too great or right-of-way too narrow or restrictive, then there should be exceptions. In other words, encourage it where it's feasible and makes sense, but don't write it into the code everywhere and create an economic burden.Thanks for requesting input!
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Barking Dogs

Greater stricter ordinances needed on barking dogs where police can directly issue noise nuisance tickets. One barking dog can destroy the peace easily of people within a quarter mile circumference which can spell tens of people. No one wins including the dog that is only incessantly barking because it is neglected.
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Zoning

Tiny homes need to be allowable. Currently they are not.
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Recoding

I feel that a couple of the questions did not have adequate answers. For question # 1 I would have answered, "should not occur" rather than what was listed. Some neighborhoods are already zoned inappropriately for multi-family dwellings when they were designed to be single family. This is particularly detrimental in older neighborhoods, such as ours, which has inappropriate small apartment buildings that don't blend in with older, historic homes.Additionally, the allowance of free standing buildings for adult children or aging parents would depend upon many factors, such as lot size, size of existing structures, etc.
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Sidewalks/ Walkability

I've been told that builders of new developments are not required to install sidewalks. This, to me, doesn't make any sense. I feel like they should be required to be built at the time a new development is put in place. This cost should NOT fall onto the city. As a current resident of Sequoyah Hills (and former resident of Holston Hills), I lament the fact that so many of our neighborhoods aren't more pedestrian friendly. The addition of sidewalks to new neighborhoods might free up some money to add sidewalks to older neighborhood like Sequoyah and Holston Hills and others that were in existence before the importance of sidewalks was realized.I've often wondered if it wouldn't be possible to improve walkability in some neighborhoods by changing traffic patterns on some roads. You could convert roads that are currently 2-way into be one-way roads. I feel like this could work, for example, in an area where there are 2, 2-way roads running parallel to one another (both lacking sidewalks). You could perhaps make each road one way (one now becomes south-bound only, while the other becomes north-bound only.) The now unused lane on each road is repurposed as a "pedestrian lane". We live on Arrowhead Trail in Sequoyah and I could see this working nicely in combination with Noelton Drive. Neither of these roads have sidewalks and it definitely prevents most people from walking to the local groceries and shops. I would imagine this would have to be less expensive than putting in sidewalks and it wouldn't necessarily increase traffic on either road. Perhaps it is less of a hassle, as well, with regards to getting the neighbors to agree to it as well because you wouldn't be taking away any of their front yard to convert to sidewalk... just a thought!Thanks for seeking out our opinions on recoding the city. Knoxville has come such a long way in the 12 years that I've lived here... let's keep up the amazing progress!!! Improving walkability in neighborhoods and pedestrian access to local stores and shops will be such a boon to the city... less cars on the road, healthier citizens and an even more desirable place to call home!
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Signage

I believe new sign ordinance or variances should be investigated, specifically addressing the individual personality, architecture and history of each neighborhood.
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Sidewalks

With the growth in South Knoxville, particularly the Sevier Heights area, we need sidewalks badly. Walkers on Sevierville Pike have to walk in people yards, the ditch and/or the middle of the road. In many places there is no where to go if cars are coming. Many times a day, people who live in apartments on Redbud walk down the street to the bus stop or convenient store and cars need to veer to avoid them.
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Old North Knox

If downtown is the front porch of a community then Old North Knoxville is certainly primed to become Knoxville's living room. The historic 4th and Gill to its east provides a blueprint for what old north can become. And working to keep the growth going that direction should be at the top of the city's list. Pedestrian walkways from the new breweries and eateries popping up and expanding the bike lanes throughout Central Avenue will go a long way. Broadway could also use the same love. People my age want to live close to downtown. Being 31, old north can be the place that makes Knoxville boom.
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Sidewalks

After taking the city's survey I would like to add that we need more sidewalks in Knoxville. It would also be nice if the road work being done to Western Avenue was completed.
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Zoning Considerations

I would prefer to see current single family neighborhoods retain their single family neighborhood status. Multifamily homes, apartment and condo complexes, and commercial buildings have destroyed the character of existing neighborhoods like Fort Sanders. I don't want that to happen in the area just north of downtown: LIncoln Park/Oakwood, Old North, Fourth and Gill, North Hills and its environs.
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Rezoning Traffic Concerns

As a long term resident (18 years) of one of Knoxville's historic and urban neigjborhoods, I have many thoughts/concerns on the topic of Knoxville's rezoning. Number one on my list is increased traffic, which I do not feel is being publicly discussed/addressed equivalent to to other concerns. I would like to see measures put into place to decrease increased traffic, along with zoning changes. We have witnessed first-hand the effects of latent traffic calming attempts and it is quite simply ineffective.
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Additional Zoning

1. We need to insist upon underground utilities going forward. Eventually it all needs to go that way, but certainly in new developments. 2. Anytime a neighborhood is put in, there needs to be a tax or a development fee of some sort to cover the increased stress on the community- additional students in the schools, traffic control. 3. I see too many new developments that have no aesthetics and don't take care of entrance ways or widen narrow roads to include a turn lane into the subdivision. I see a lot of run-off. 4. NO BRADFORD PEARS. Landscaping should require natives- like maples and dogwoods- to retain the unique nature of our communities and to provide food sources for local critters. 5. Green space within neighborhoods- some wild area or a field to play in, a piece of woods left would be nice.
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(no Title)

I have very little respect for some of your building code officials. In my previous experience of renovating 3 houses in Knoxville, some of them are pompous kings in their own little areas of code enforcement. One told me he could tear down a house in an area where we were trying to redevelop 8 houses. He could do it because it was condemned because the absentee owner would not cooperate with code enforcement or sell the property, or answer any mail concerning his empty house. The fact that it would affect the development of the rest of the properties meant nothing to this man. One plumbing inspector refused to give a CO for one of the 8 houses because the toilet was 1/2 inch too close to the toilet in a half bath. That was the only thing keeping the owner from obtaining the CO. 1/2"! I truly believe that if code enforcement had been more flexible there would be 8 renovated Victorian houses on W. Baxter, instead of everything torn down in the entire block of houses except for two little little houses. What a waste. I have heard similar horror stories from people trying to remodel or renovate buildings. I wonder that any investors have ever finished any projects in this town.
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Vacant Buildings Down Chapman Hwy

There are several empty old business that line all the way down chapman highway that could help boost the economy of this town if they were cleaned up and used to bring business (local and nonlocal). At a glance the majority of Chapman highway is run down and an ugly site to look at. If this area were to be cleaned up that could bring many new businesses and possible new places of residency could help give local residents and college students more options without having to sacrifice being away from businesses. This area is horrible and needs to be cleaned up!!
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Sidewalks

Rezoning codes should include mandatory sidewalks to meet ADA standards. KAT stops should include landing pads so that wheelchairs can load and unload safely.
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Comments

when will you answer my questions? When will you send me a newsletter? When will you have a clear recording of the community meeting? When will you be placing project documents in the library in the project docs link? When will the media contact be answering my questions as well? Separate from this form6/22/2017screenshotting this
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Format Of The Survey

It was easy- best practices, I think, were answers of "yes" or "very important."
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Short Term Rentals

I find it odd that your survey didn't include any questions relating to the short term rental issue. The proposal as it exists will be a disaster for R1 neighborhoods. Additionally, I found the survey extremely biased and leading in nature. Personally, I couldn't give two cents about sustainability and don't think my tax dollars should could be used to fund projects that are designed to combat, so called man made global warming.
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Residential Neighborhoods

Residential neighborhoods such as R1 and SW1 need to be protected from encroachment of non-residential. Old homes need to be saved for their character as residential and stay residential. Parking restrictions in those neighborhoods that will have impact from non-resident traffic need to move forward with MPC and Council. Building heights and setbacks restricted to retain a neighborhood's character. STR not allowed or only by homeowner living on premise or in house as was stated in public meetings and generally accepted to control STR in residential areas such as R1 and SW1. There needs to be minimum parking requirements added to the FBC as commercial is already removing parking from their places of business, which pushes parking into places that should not have to deal with the spaces these business are removing from their locations. They are not sharing parking with other commercial but removing parking because there is no minimum required parking. This is a main issue with FBC and multi-use.
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City's Has A Role In Educating The Public

The City should help to educate the public about the importance of adaptive reuse and other preservation-related topics and activities. The message should include 1) the idea that everyone benefits from preservation activities ("It's not just for do-gooders"), and 2) preservation is good economics -- that it attracts people and businesses, and that it is cheaper to reuse/repurpose than to tear down and rebuild.The City's education effort would reinforce and support the work of other preservation-minded entities (like Knox Heritage, neighborhood organizations, and committed individuals). This broad-based education program is important because the issues are complex, and many (most?) people are not actively involved with them and may not understand them. This is a legitimate role for government.
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Fair Housing

Fair housing laws already require that zoning regulations not be used to prevent or discourage development of housing for certain classes or types of people. It would be helpful, nonetheless, if the new zoning regulations include explicit language to remind people of those fair housing laws as they consider the implications of zoning requirements on any given proposal. The purpose of zoning regulations is to help make decisions about appropriate and compatible land use. Too often these decisions and deliberations are hijacked by those who are already in an area and would like to prevent others that they perceive as different from them to also be able to live there. The more explicit we are about how fair housing laws limit the use of zoning laws to keep 'those people' away (whoever 'those people' are this time), the less time will be wasted discussing factors that cannot legally be used to make zoning decisions.
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Reviewing Codes Survey

Points I'd like to cover based on questions asked in the survey.I believe there needs to be a mixed use provision for the downtown area if the code hasn't already been updated. I'm thinking along the lines of commercial on ground floor and residential above.Some means to encourage smaller commercial spaces. For example, limit a Walmart or Kroger mega-store from opening in a downtown area and instead encourage smaller grocery and retail stores.Curb the amount of advertising on roadsides, much like the town of Farragut does. Signs limited in size, limited in height, etc.I voted against the 'historic tree' preservation mainly because of the ginko trees that line certain roads. I hate those things and the Bradford pears that started cropping up in the 80s. I'm not against old oaks and the like, just the "fad" trees some landscaper decided to add on a whim that later turn to be a nuisance.Thank you for your time and attention.
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Additional Comments

This is your chance to really make a positive impact on the future of our community. I have a Master's Degree in Bioregional Planning, but got too depressed by the field- essentially just bowing to developers, so I know a little bit of what you're up against. It's a delicate balance. I bought a new house in an old neighborhood 9 years ago and ride my bike to work every day. Infill development is critical- sometimes it happens from developers like it did in my case, but most often it needs to be encouraged and incentivized. Mixed use is key. Connectivity. Sidewalks, bike lanes or at least shoulders or bikeable roads, greenways. Do what needs to be done to make transit a more viable option for people. Developers need to pay into the infrastructure and should be required to have sidewalks or other connectivity. Limit dead-ends. People should have options of how to get to home and to work etc- both in terms of mode of transport, and in terms of which direction to take- not only one way in and one way out which is far too common in Knoxville and every community in this country. Thanks for your efforts. I'm happy to help how I can.
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Zoning

Of recent interest to me is utility poles. We are beginning to have an epidemic of double poles and in some case triple poles as non electric lines fail to move to replaced poles. In many cases there has been no change in poles replaced multiple years ago. A solution needs to be found to resolve this issue. I would recommend credits back to the landowner of the double pole location paid for by the non- moved lines.Second, Is there any zoning regulations for the colors attached to utilities lines. AT&T is placing orange tags all over the city which are ugly. Who is to stop somebody from putting fluorescent yellow or purple next. If they are covered by zoning regulation and have not gotten permission please have them stop. The colors are for AT&T convenience. Black with white letters would work just as well.It might be nice to remind the citizens and law enforcement about the laws associated with obstructing a sidewalk.
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Work At Home

Code should be modified to allow work at home provisions regardless of the zoning provided no adverse impact on those living within the neighborhood including no additional traffic, no additional on-street parking, no additional visible storage or equipment on the property or along the street, no additional noise created by the business.Not sure if noise provisions are currently incorporated in zoning. If not they should be.I'm also not sure what provisions are currently incorporated to define and eliminate nuisances.
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More Sustainability

I was very excited when I saw a whole section in the survey for "sustainability." But we need more! There should be credits and/or incentives for new and old buildings to incorporate greener building practices and design buildings that use less energy (LEED). If there are any current zoning codes that restrict the use of solar panels, solar water heaters, rain barrels etc. in residential or commercial areas, these codes should be revisited. Homeowners and commercial sites should be able to generate their own energy and use natural resources to help fuel their lives.
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Keep Knoxville A Community Type Enviroment

Knoxville, is a growing city that has maintained a community type environment. I hope to see the redevelopment of existing structures, new green areas, more bike and walking trails to connect communities. Develop Knoxville in much the same way the downtown area is being redeveloped. Provide incentives for developers to use local business to build and construct, keep the money in our area.
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Trees & Power Lines

KUB trims the trees along the side of the roads and cuts a lot of the trees in half because of the power lines. I understand the reasons for this but you can clearly see that the remainder of the tree that is left is now a hazard to the community. Perhaps the answer is to re due the power lines in heavily populated ares underground.
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Infill Housing

I would love to see infill housing that encourages alternative inexpensive living arrangements. Many city lots could contain 2 "tiny" or shotgun homes. Some examples of these have been in existence for 100 years. See: single lot on Woodbine with two old shotguns. I can get the address. It takes nothing away from our historicity to allow this to occur again.
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Recode Knoxville

Appreciate the opportunity to say how much I appreciate that Knoxville is moving toward a much higher walkability scale. And adding a focus in keeping our beautiful trees too.
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Helping Knoxville Grow

Regarding development and Greenspace, there is a need for additional signage on the Mountain Bike Trails in our great city whether on the trails or more notes on the maps. Regarding Landscaping, we want to insure the grass is cut so no neighbor has to deal with a resident who owns a property but rarely visits it and thus it is not maintained. The city of Knoxville should have a list of owners or neighborhood contacts, main contact number accessible through 311 if the landscape codes are violated often. There is a 2-3 week window to reach the violator, however, some residents or owners may not currently be reachable and when they return, they receive a bill from the City for having mowed their yard. I do not blame the City in any way and thank them. Responsibility involves checking on your property, possibly having a neighbor contact you if you live out of town. No one wants a neighbor with tall grass, weeds and all the insects and mosquitoes that may take up residence due to neglect in the city limits especially.Possibly, some of these suggestions can be incorporated into a new City Map if you design a new Map of Knoxville. With the National Bike Race that was in Knoxville this weekend.I believe we will have the National Bike Race here again in 2018 and 2019 and possibly this can be advertised more. We had great positive views from the recent race, now lets step it up Knoxville to have more of the "Tour De France "as the "Tour De Knoxville" supporting local businesses, out of town racers and the community. I would recommend to add distances for walking trails throughout the city starting with miles 1.0, 1.5, 2. 0 etc. Initially, depending on Budgets, it could be every 2.5 miles for signage or the trail length each way posted or add to maps. Possibly a 4H,Girl or Boy Scout, or Sorority Project. At Iams, people with dogs, bag up their stools and leave the bagged stools on the side of the trail. Possibly, a few more trashcans or an incentive to return it to the beginning or end of the trail noted on the trail map. Caution: We are thankful, responsible pet owners do bag it up. As a pet owner, knowing your dogs digestive trac will help when they have stools. For example, beagles have a 5 hour trac. Congratulations to all our Mayors, City Staff & Employees, Businesses, Farmers Markets, City Events and the people who work, live, donate and make Knoxville what it is today. Remember, we grow, you grow, we all benefit. For residents who do not work and want to help the City, you may wish to get out and Volunteer for an area you enjoy. Support your local and Small businesses with shopping to keep them here. Too much on-line shopping, does not help our beautiful city. Knoxville and TN has done better than other cities and States through the recession because locals reinvest in Knoxville and in TN. Walk the Mall on a rainy day for exercise and possibly to buy something to help grow Knoxville's tax dollars to help pay for making Knoxville an even better city. Enjoy the Outdoor Benefits! Welcome visitors who also grow our TAX dollars by staying in local Hotels and eating at our Restaurants. Knoxville has more restaurants per capita than any other city.And of Course, we have the VOLS!
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