Throughout the project, we’ll post questions and comments that have been submitted on comment cards collected at community meetings, sent via email or submitted via the website.

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Zoning Question

A property directly behind our neighborhood has been proposed for re-zoning. The address is: 725 Sterchi Ridge Way (apartments). The property is currently zoned RP-1. The proposed re-zoning would classify it as RN-5. My understanding is the RP-1 designation allows up to six dwelling units per acre. The developer was able to concentrate development in a small part of the ~30 acre property and meet that zoning requirement. We were told that under that zoning, further development would not be allowed. What will the RN-5 zoning change mean in terms of potential future development?
Staff Reply:

Zoning Map

Put back the Orange, but not just for expensive high rise condos, build more affordable housing!
Staff Reply:

Zone Correction

This concerns a property that doesn't currently have an address, but is listed on KGIS Map as Parcel ID:107FG04101. It is on the east side of Hollywood Road, south of the I-40 right-of-way, adjacent to 617 Hollywood road in the Pond Gap community.In Ordinance No. O-124-2018, the City Council rezoned the property to RP-1 with one condition, and I want to make sure that the condition, SLPA, is carried forward to the new property. (reference MPC File No. 7-B18-RZ)
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We Need More Options For Affordable Housing!

Bring Back the Orange! in our core neighborhoods by utilizing RN-3,4, and 5 zones to allow for a greater range of housing choices in walkable, bus-friendly neighborhoods. Please adopt appropriate zoning & standards to encourage good design, scale, and development in a manner that will protect our neighborhoods while still allowing them to evolve.
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Sequoyah Hills

I am concerned about how the recode will affect property values in Sequoyah Hills, in particular mine which is one of the most affordable (and smallest) homes in the neighborhood. While it's not a perfect solution, I think what would alleviate quite a bit of my apprehension is to move all the proposed RN-1 and RN-2 parcels to EN parcels.
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Rezoning Of Kesterson Road

I was made aware that the street I live on is being considered for re-zoning. I would like to express my concern about this change. I am opposed to the change of changing Kesterson road to RN-2. . I do not want my street to be changed from RN -1 to RN-2. I feel that the change will decrease my property values, as well as the possibility of homes being converted into apartment buildings. One of things my neighbors are proud of is that we are single dwelling homes. I feel that I live in a very safe neighborhood, but if homes are able to be multiple dwellings, I feel that safety could be a concern. Please consider not changing our street & neighborhood zone.
Staff Reply:
The RN-2 district is a single family designation which permits the same uses as the RN-1 district. The difference between the RN-1 district and the RN-2 district is the minimum lot size. In the RN-1 district it is proposed to be 10,000 square feet while in the RN-2 district it is proposed to be 5,000 square feet. MPC staff is evaluating the need for another single family residential district with a minimum lot size of 7,000 to 7,500 square feet.

Rezoning

I am concerned that multi-family housing is being decreased in the Recode process and encourage city council and the MPC to redesign the map and Put the Orange Back.
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Rezoning

PUT THE ORANGE BACK!
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Rezoning

I am firmly against the rezoning of any R1 neghiborhoods being rezoned to the new R2 zoning. You stated that the only difference in the new classification was lot sizes. I seriously doubt that is the only reason this change is needed. Reclassification for property tax hike maybe. Leave our neghiborhoods alone.
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Rezoning

Please help us to preserve the Kesterwood, Oak park, Gibbs Road area from changes in the current zoning. The Jacksboro pike Corridor has deteriorated to the point where I will no longer walk the area. I cannot allow my grandchildren to be on bikes without me outside watching them. Section 8 housing, homelessness, and crime have escalated to the point where I no longer recognize my neighborhood. I have lived on those two streets for 22 years and now feel unsafe. Theft is rampant and prostitutes stroll the area between the firehall at Essary to the overpass on Old Broadway. Please help save our neighborhood and preserve property values. Please!! Thank you!!
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Rezoning

Please don't rezone Parkridge. I am a victim of domestic abuse. I need affordable housing that is not in the unsafe housing projects.
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Reconsider The Recode

We need more not less affordable housing in Knoxville. According to the City and County’s most recent Community Block Development Grant reports, more than 21,000 low to moderate income families in Knox County are paying more than 50% of their income for housing costs. These families live under constant stress of eviction. This high number indicates a crisis in affordable housing in our community. From other information I have gathered, based on growth projections for the city, we need to be building between 3 and 5 affordable housing units per day in our community by 2040. The proposed map put forth by the City Council and the MPC as a result of the ReCode process appears to reduce the potential to build affordable housing in Knoxville. I urge the City Council and the MPC to redesign the map. I appreciate the thoughtfulness in including higher density housing along the corridors, but the drastic reduction in the orange and tan areas of the current map is concerning. I urge the City Council and the MPC to think more carefully about how to encourage affordable housing in existing neighborhoods. I urge the City Council and the MPC to returning some of the orange areas to the zoning map and to include areas on the map which allow for RN3 and RN4 zoning, two new categories created during the ReCode process but not used in the proposed map.
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Recoding Residential Areas

Question-Why are some areas within the same are are coded R! and others are coded R2. My property is located on Michaels Ln and is coded as R1. What is the difference between R1 and R2 coding codes?
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Recoding

BRING THE ORANGE BACK !
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Recode Schedule

I would like to see the comment period extended for this phase. There is still a meeting scheduled in October for the Five Points Community. I think neighbors need more time to view the maps and learn about zoning. I am also concerned about the timing of the passage of Recode. I do not think it should be going to City Council until after the holidays.
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Recode New Zoning: Put The Orange Back.

Put the Orange Back, please. Knoxville needs more affordable housing, not less. Too many families in our community are paying 50% or more for their housing monthly. This ratio is unacceptable and puts these families at high risk of homelessness. Please revise this proposal.
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Recode Map

Is there a way to download the draft version of the new zoning map?
Staff Reply:
The new map, along with tools to compare the existing zoning and provide comments, are available for online viewing.

Recode Knoxville "bring Back The Orange!"

Bring back the orange in our core neighborhoods by utilizing RN-3,4, and 5 zones to allow for a greater range of housing choices in walkable, bus-friendly neighborhoods. Please adopt appropriate zoning & standards to encourage good design, scale, and development in a manner that will protect our neighborhoods while still allowing them to evolve.
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Recode Knoxville -- Op Zoning Districts 10-8-18

Hi:I am a resident of West Hills and frequently travel on Middlebrook Pike, Weisgarber, and Lonas.In looking at Draft 1 of the proposed Maps for Middlebrook Pike, Weisgarber, and Lonas areas, I noticed that there are many parcels with a proposed OP (Office Park) zoning district. This includes the large parcel of vacant land which Tennova had planned to build a hospital, vacant parcels across Middlebrook Pike, and other nearby parcels that are either vacant land or have already been developed as offices. The Recode Use Matrix, Article 9.2 shows the Permitted Uses for the OP zoning district. OP includes Eating and Drinking Establishments, Retail Goods Establishments, and Food Truck Parks, among other things as Permitted Uses. Gas Stations are allowed as a Special Use. These uses are very different from what is presently allowed in Office zoning districts in our existing Ordinance.These types of developments would increase traffic considerably, and add additional noise and bright lights which will adversely affect West Hills properties which are adjacent to or nearby the Tennova property, and will adversely affect many West HIlls residents and others who use the already heavily traveled Middlebrook Pike/Weisgarber corridors.Office zoned properties have long been used as a buffer between residential and commercial properties and that should be maintained for these type properties under Recode.Therefore, I request that Eating and Drinking Establishments, Retail Goods Sales, Food Truck Parks and Gas Stations be removed as Permitted Uses or Special Uses in the Office Park zoning districts. In addition, Eating and Drinking Establishments should be allowed only as Accessory Uses to serve the employees and clients of that office building, along with standards that the restaurant not be a free-standing building. It should only be accessible from within the building.Thank you for your consideration.
Staff Reply:

Recode Knoxville

We need more not less affordable housing in Knoxville. According to the City and County's most recent Community Block Development Grant reports, more than 21,000 low to moderate income families in Knox County are paying more than 50% of their income for housing costs. These families live under constant stress of eviction. This high number indicates a crisis in affordable housing in our community. From other information I have gathered, based on growth projections for the city, we need to be building between 3 and 5 affordable housing units per day in our community by 2040. The proposed map put forth by the City Council and the MPC as a result of the ReCode process appears to reduce the potential to build affordable housing in Knoxville. I urge the City Council and the MPC to redesign the map. I appreciate the thoughtfulness in including higher density housing along the corridors, but the drastic reduction in the orange and tan areas of the current map is concerning. I urge the City Council and the MPC to think more carefully about how to encourage affordable housing in existing neighborhoods. I urge the City Council and the MPC to returning some of the orange areas to the zoning map and to include areas on the map which allow for RN3 and RN4 zoning, two new categories created during the ReCode process but not used in the proposed map.
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Recode Knoxville

If you cannot tell by the current homeless crisis in this city, the elimination of multi-family housing is definitely not what we need. The new zoning code needs the same or more amount of space for these types of dwellings so that we may be able to get people off the streets and into a home. Put back the orange.
Staff Reply:

Recode Input Comments

Least restrictive zoning should be applied to center city neighborhoods with high rental property occupancy (often African American people with limited income) so as not to displace them through gentrification.Sidewalks, lighting, green spaces are all important.Craft dwellings (live upstairs/shop downstairs) should be permitted where it does not compromise character of neighborhood,Mixed use/re-use of vacant buildings in keeping with character of established neighborhoods should be considered.Revitalization/re-development of East Town needs urgent attention.Hillside protection overlay should not make owner occupied renovation/addition a difficult process.Supporting Burlington revitalization is a priority.More clarity is needed around opportunity for Tiny Homes as accessory dwellingsThank you Urban League for helping to make this process more understandable.
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Recode

I am concerned that the new map has less affordable housing when more is needed. Please reconsider and add the orange areas back.
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Recode

Bring back the orange. The proposed map doesn't allow for affordable housing and increased density.
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Re-zoning

I am alarmed to see the proposed reduction of land that can be used for multi-family housing development. We are already facing an affordable housing crisis in Knoxville and can ill-afford to lose the ability to develop additional multi-family units.
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Put The Orange Back

It is well known that we are not just in need but are desperately in need of affordable housing in Knoxville. Please put the Orange Back on our map to increase areas for affordable housing.
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Put The Orange Back

Due to the amount of homeless people in our communities, I ask that you do a second draft of the map that includes more opportunities for affordable housing.
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Put The Orange Back

Knoxville needs more affordable housing. Do not change the zoning.
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Put The Orange Back

- Return to the proposed zoning map all areas zoned for multifamily housing in the current zoning map.- Reduce zoning constraints on housing types or change to more flexible zoning ordinances to allow by right a variety of housing choices while maintaining neighborhood character.- Allow by right in low-density residential zones duplexes, three-flats, and small four-unit buildings within single family areas. Such modest increase in density potential immediately opens up huge development potential without threatening the existing character of neighborhoods.- Develop standards for new construction that ensure new housing types are compatible with existing housing.- Revise the Recode zoning map to provide opportunities to build small multifamily housing (2-8 units) by right (RN-4):o On and near transit corridors.o As a transition from commercial to single family zones.o In areas with a significant presence of existing small multi-family housing.o On vacant land.- Promote dynamic new centers that provide a mix of land uses, including affordable housing, that are aligned with moving our city toward public transportation, walkability, and accessibility to jobs, retail, recreation, and amenities. Adopt development standards such as site design requirements and buffering requirements that allow residents to live in closer proximity to their jobs, transportation system and markets.
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Put Back The Orange

And also add the other 2 Re-Code areas for multi-family, low cost housing. Too many people are unable to find affordable housing.
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Put Back The Orange

Put Back the Orange, Put Back the Orange, Put Back the Orange...we need more - not less - affordable multi-family housing in Knoxville. Put Back the Orange.
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Put Back The Orange

Here in the fall season with the Vols trying to get into the spirit for winning games, the Metropolitan Planning Commision is taking away the color orange from the community. One of the major problems in Knoxville - in Knox County - and in all communities across the country affordable housing is the major need for all cities and counties. By limiting so drastically the areas where multiple housing buildings can be be built, the Commission is building into the local community more homeless families and more families less able to afford the bare necessities for their families.Pleas think twice - then three times - then delay for a month and think again about how your decisions may affect the people living in Knoxville. Do you really want to make decent housing unavailable for more families in Knoxville and Knox County in the years to come. I hope that is not your desire.Thanks
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Put Back The Orange

More multi-family housing is needed in Knoxville . . . Put back the ORANGE!
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Put Back The Orange

Put Back The Orange.
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Put Back The Orange

To whom it may concernI am a resident of Knoxville and spend a lot of time in east Knoxville. I am really glad to see the work being done on Magnolia but I am definitely against changing the zoning along Magnolia to single family. I think this will create many hardships for people living in this area and even impact transit service.Thank you for taking this into consideration.
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Proposed Rezoning

Put the orange back in!! We need more and not less.
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Proposed Recode Map

We need more not less affordable housing in Knoxville. According to the City and County's most recent Community Block Development Grant reports, more than 21,000 low to moderate income families in Knox County are paying more than 50% of their income for housing costs. These families live under constant stress. This high number indicates a crisis in affordable housing in our community. From other information I have gathered, based on growth projections for the city, we need to be building between 3 and 5 affordable housing units per day in our community by 2040.The proposed map put forth by the City Council and the MPC as a result of the ReCode process appears to reduce the potential to build affordable housing in Knoxville. I urge the City Council and the MPC to redesign the map. I appreciate the thoughtfulness in including higher density housing along the corridors, but the drastic reduction in the orange and tan areas of the current map is concerning. I urge the City Council and the MPC to think more carefully about how to encourage affordable housing in existing neighborhoods. I urge the City Council and the MPC to return some of the orange areas to the zoning map and to include areas on the map which allow for RN3 and RN4 zoning, two new categories created during the ReCode process but not used in the proposed map.
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Process Of Reaching The Citizens

I have now been to two of your public meetings. Both meetings combined had maybe 90 people. When I talk with my neighbors almost 100% are completely unaware of this radical transformation of the city. Even if they would find out, the complexities of the code changes preclude comprehension for the average citizen. No hard data is presented about the impact of these changes on property values and city services. The presentation team "sells" the concept and obfuscation rules. If they were to spell out explicitly that the "Single Family Residence" will be dead throughout the city after these changes and that all residential properties will be zoned as "duplex," the majority of tax payers would be outraged.
Staff Reply:
First, the R-1 (Low Density Residential) zone currently allows duplexes as a Use on Review. This can be viewed in the City's Code of Ordinances, Appendix B, Section IV, Section 2.1.1. Part C.10. A review of the City's older zoning ordinances shows that the provision for two-family housing units was introduced as an amendment in mid-1960's (Ordinance 3616, September 22, 1964). It should be further noted that the Established Neighborhood districts (EN-1 and EN-2) also permit duplexes as Use on Review, although with a specification that they property be located on a lot with two-street frontages. At present, if a property owner in an R-1, EN-1 or EN-2 zoned area wished to construct a duplex, an application is made to the MPC and a public hearing would be held. The new RN-1 and RN-2 districts propose a continuation of a similar procedure with the issuance of a building permit contingent upon a public hearing being held and approval by the Planning Commission.Second, an examination of MPC records for the period from 1992 to present show only a handful of instances where owners sought to construct duplexes within the R-1 zone. Over that 27-year period, there were a total of 54 applications with 32 ultimately receiving approval. On average, that equates to a little more than 1 duplex a year being approved in R-1 districts. Since 2015, only two applications have been made and both were withdrawn prior to the hearing. For reference, the R-1 district covers over 33,000 parcels in the City and represents about 53% of all residentially-zoned parcels.Third, in zoning districts were duplexes are permitted by right (without the requirement for a public hearing) new construction of this style of housing is slightly more common, but still represents a fraction of the housing stock constructed in the City. These zones include the R-1A and R-2 district where, on average, about 18 duplexes have been constructed annually over the period from 2005 to present.

Please Put Back The Orange

Please put back the orange areas on the map. This is supposed to be VOL country right? Need more orange. Thanks!!
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Overlay Hp

I am a land owner who just found out my property is currently in the process of a overlay of hp. We were completely surprised by this and would like to talk to someone to explain to us exactly what this will mean to our property value and taxes if this is approved.
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Olp And Recode

Hello,As I understand it, Recode will remove the infill Housing Guidelines protecting my neighborhood, Oakwood-Lincoln Park. The guidelines that protect my neighborhood from improper building styles and help to protect the historic integrity of the neighborhood rather than blindly increasing density by decreasing lot size. This is a historic neighborhood with large trees and many large lots. It's on the rebound and it has some struggling areas, but we should protect it. This neighborhood should be protected under RN 2.
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Nothing Less

PUT BACK THE ORANGE!
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Northwest Hills Proposed Zone Rn-2?

To whom this may concern:As a home owner in Northwest Hills, I'd like to understand the reasoning behind switching the zoning from single-family homes to RN-2, especially considering surrounding areas are zoned RN-1.Already, homes are being rented to college students and people are parking on both sides of the street, basically restricting it to one-way traffic.The street is less than 30ft wide, which per city code 1962, 26-1307 suggests that street parking be limited to one side of the street.
Staff Reply:
The RN-2 district is a single family designation which permits the same uses as the RN-1 district, as noted on the attached table. The difference between the RN-1 district and the RN-2 district is the minimum lot size. In the RN-1 district it is proposed to be 10,000 square feet while in the RN-2 district it is proposed to be 5,000 square feet. MPC staff is evaluating the need for another single family residential district with a minimum lot size of 7,000 to 7,500 square feet.

No Inflill For Oakwood-lincoln Park

We need to preserve our neighborhood. Please follow the informed recommendations of the OLPNA.
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New Knoxville Recode Map

I am concerned about the current proposed rezoning map. It looks like there is a lot less area allowing multi-unit dwellings. I can understand why people might object to huge apartment buildings and massive development, but where are the RN3 and RN4 zoning areas. Buildings with small numbers of units would fit into neighborhoods very easily, without changing their character. They would also allow more houses that could be affordable to hard working people whose wages are closer to the minimum wage.
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Naacp Recode Comments

Please find attached the Knoxville Branch NAACP comments on the Recode Knoxville zoning map, as approved by the Executive Committee on 8/28/18.
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Multi-family Housing Zoning

Knoxville needs to be zoned for more affordable, multi-family housing.
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Multi-family Housing In The Rezone Plan

Bring back the orange in the Knoxville rezoning map. More ability to provide affordable housing is needed - not less.
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More Housing Choices For Knoxville

Bring Back the Orange! in our core neighborhoods by utilizing RN-3,4, and 5 zones to allow for a greater range of housing choices in walkable, bus-friendly neighborhoods. Please adopt appropriate zoning & standards to encourage good design, scale, and development in a manner that will protect our neighborhoods while still allowing them to evolve.
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More Affordable Housing

Knoxville needs more affordable housing. Recent surveys indicate that 21,000 citizens of Knoxville pay more than 50% of their income for housing. The people who live and work in our city deserve affordable housing. If we can't get employers to pay a wage that allows people to afford their housing, we can certainly provide opportunities for housing through other means. Put the Orange Back!
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